“Easy A”

MOVIE REVIEW: “Easy A” stars Emma Stone (La La Land, Birdman or [The Unexpected Virtue of Ignorance]), Penn Badgley (Margin Call, You [TV series]), Amanda Bynes (Hairspray [2007], Robots), Aly Michalka (iZombie [TV series], Weepah Way for Now), Dan Byrd (Cougar Town [TV series], Utopia [TV series]), Thomas Hayden Church (The Peanut Butter Falcon, Spider-Man 3), Patricia Clarkson (Shutter Island, The Station Agent), Stanley Tucci (Road to Perdition, The Daytrippers), Cam Gigandet (Twilight, Never Back Down), Lisa Kudrow (Friends [TV series], The Comeback [TV series]), Malcolm McDowell (A Clockwork Orange, Star Trek: Generations), and Fred Armisen (Portlandia [TV series], Anchorman: The Legend of Ron Burgundy). It is directed by Will Gluck (Peter Rabbit [2018], Friends with Benefits) and written by Bert V. Royal (Recovery Road [TV series], 13). After lying to her friend that she had sex over the weekend, clean-cut highschooler Olive (Stone) suddenly garners great attention from her peers, transforming her self-image and leading her down a dark path.

Ever read “The Scarlett Letter” in high school? Depending on how you answer that question will factor into how impressed you will find this story. Well, not really – as they do explain the plot of “The Scarlett Letter” – but regardless, “Easy A” serves as a modern, fresh, John Hughes-y rendition of the clean-cut-turned-slut storyline that will surely entertain, dazzle, and raise a few eyebrows. What is this movie? How have I not seen it until now? It’s an oddball of a picture that explores the perplexities of a fake self-image that ultimately isn’t a good one (who would want to be seen as a floozy?). Yet, it speaks volumes into how one woman who, in wanting to do something right/help others, throws away her own respect. It’s a fun movie, with quirky dialogue that no normal person would say and funny situations that will either make you laugh or cringe. The performances in this are solid, with an array of cast members that create witty characters. Emma Stone did a particularly exceptioinal job in the role of Olive, leading the charge and providing enough sincerity so as to not let us hate her character (because there were certainly moments/situations that would make anyone annoyed by her). She made this movie work – along with the whimsy writing – and her co-stars made for funny people as well. Notable performances include Thomas Haden Church, Stanley Tucci, and Patricia Clarkson, all of whom have wild lines and interesting character types (granted, Haden Church is one of the more serious people). The story itself that these characters fill the space of is well-structured. It bases itself in the individual character arcs, all of which ramp to a shared climax. As you progress through the narrative, things just get more complicated for these individuals, specifically Olive, all of which creates a balance of both comedy and drama. It’s a coming-of-age story… I guess. There’s certainly a lesson to be learned by some characters and the structure of it all fits that mold. You’ve got your lead character narrating (via a web blog-thingy), teen angst, and backstabbing. Oh, not to mention how all the high schoolers look like they’re in their mid-twenties. It’s films like these that made me believe I’d look way older when I got to high school than I actually did. “Easy A” is a quirky, fun picture with enough emotional weight and original idea to make for a different watch. If you’re into this genre of filmmaking, you’ll certainly enjoy it. FINAL SCORE: 82%= Juicy Popcorn

Here is the trailer:

One response to ““Easy A”

  1. Pingback: October Movie Rankings | Juicy Reviews·

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